Acts of Reckoning

Examining questions of history, truth-telling and decolonisation, Acts of Reckoning reframes the past in order to form new futures – and celebrates how much work is already underway.

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Image credit: Michael Cook, Undiscovered #3 2010

Submissions open:
A Matter of Taste


Food is more than sustenance – it's spectacle, status symbol and social currency.

Griffith Review is looking for submissions that address all things food. If we are what we eat, how do we frame what we eat to express who we are? How do we signal culturally with our cuisine? What, ultimately, does our diet denote?

Further details, and how to submit, are available here.

Image credit: Trevor Smith, Christmas Ham (2016)

 

World Storytelling Day

World Storytelling Day


To mark World Storytelling Day 2022, Griffith Review presents a series of online exclusives that explore the promises and perils of education and the importance of telling stories from inside its different landscapes.

The Latest

  • Possession
    HOT ON THE heels of a major retrospective of the great Australian artist Gordon Bennett (1955–2014) mounted at the Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) in Queensland came A Year in Art: Australia 1992 at the Tate Modern in London last year. As a r...
  • 'The True Hero Stuff'
    ‘Arriving at the entrance to the yard, I met a white object, which proved to be a Kanaka in his Sunday clothes.’ Carl Lumholtz, Among Cannibals: An Account of Four Years’ Trav...
  • Beyond the frontier
    A LONG TIME ago, I spent a day on a replica of HMS Endeavour on Sydney Harbour. It was an uncanny experience. This ship, a reconstruction, seemed an almost inconceivably small thing to have delivered so much chan...

Current Edition

EDITION 76
Acts of Reckoning
Examining questions of history, truth-telling and decolonisation, and revisiting colonial figures and their ongoing legacies, Acts of Reckoning reframes the past in order to form new futures.

Next Edition

EDITION 77
Real Cool World
A cool look at the one continent on Earth truly free of national government, where human ideas of exploration, investigation and fantasy continue to play out.
Griffith Review