Dr Julianne Schultz AM FAHA is the founding editor of Griffith Review and Emeritus Professor of Media and Culture in of the Griffith University Centre for Social and Cultural Research. She is chair of the board of The Conversation and a member of the board of the Sydney Writers Festival. She is an acclaimed author of several books, including The Idea of Australia: A search for the soul of the nation (Allen and Unwin), Reviving the Fourth Estate (Cambridge) and Steel City Blues (Penguin), the co-author of The Phone Book (Penguin) and editor and principal author of Not Just Another Business (Pluto). She also wrote the librettos to the award-winning operas Black River and Going Into Shadows. She has contributed chapters on media, culture, technology, and gender to many other books.

Julianne  became a Member of the Order of Australia for services to journalism and the community in 2009 and an honorary fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities the following year. She is a thought leader on media and culture and an accomplished public speaker and facilitator. She has served on the board of directors of the ABC, Grattan Institute and Copyright Agency, and chaired the Australian Film TV and Radio School, Queensland Design Council and National Cultural Policy Reference Group and a member of advisory boards with a particular focus on education, journalism, innovation and culture.

This author has contributed 68 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Bronwyn Adcock is a freelance journalist who's worked in radio, television and print.

She started her career as a cadet journalist for ABC radio current affairs in 1996, reporting for AM, The World Today and PM programs. During her time at the ABC she was the recipient of the inaugural Andrew Olle Scholarship, and made a number of investigative radio documentaries for Background Briefing.

In 2002 she began reporting and filming stories for the Dateline program on SBS Television. The following year she was the first journalist ever to gain access to the inside of a refugee detention centre on the remote island of Nauru, her story winning a United Nations Media Peace Award.

She also reported extensively on the US counter-terrorism strategy of ‘Extraordinary Rendition', winning a George Munster Award for her work into the rendition of Mamdouh Habib.

Her essay, 'Walking on sunshine', reflecting on her experiences of living off the grid, is available to be downloaded for free in Griffith Review's exclusive ebook Imagining the Future: Notes from the frontier.

This author has contributed 3 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Randa Abdel-Fattah is a research fellow in the Department of Sociology at Macquarie University. She is also a multi-award winning author of eleven books for young adults and children that have been published in more than fifteen countries.

This author has contributed 3 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Dr Debra Adelaide is the author or editor of over ten books, including several reference works on Australian women writers as well as themed anthologies, such as the acclaimed Motherlove series.

She has also worked as a researcher, editor and freelance writer, and for several years was the Sydney Morning Herald's weekly ‘In Short’ book reviewer.

She has published three novels, The Hotel Albatross (1995), Serpent Dust (1998) and most recently, The Household Guide to Dying, which appeared in 2008 and has been published in over a dozen countries.

Her latest book is The Simple Act of Reading (Random House, 2015). She is Associate Professor in Creative Writing at the University of Technology, Sydney.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Adam Aitken is a professional poet, memoirist, academic and editor (with Kim Cheng Boey and Michelle Cahill) of Contemporary Asian Australian Poets (Puncher & Wattmann 2013).

His work appears in the Macquarie PEN Anthology of Australian Literature, Jacket2, Southerly, and in Life Writing.

He teaches creative writing at the University of Technology, Sydney.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Katherine Wilson is a freelance journalist and former co-editor of Overland.

This author has contributed 2 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Dr Malcolm Alexander is a social network analyst and sociologist who has published articles on corporate elite networks and corporate power structures in Australia, North America and Europe.

He convenes and teaches in the Cultural Sociology major in the Faculty of Arts at Griffith University.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Patrick Allington’s novel Figurehead (Black Inc.) was longlisted for the 2010 Miles Franklin Literary Award. His short fiction, essays and critical writing have appeared widely. His novel Rise and Shine will be published by Scribe in 2020.

This author has contributed 5 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Dennis Altman, a Professorial Fellow in Human Security at LaTrobe University, is the author of thirteen books, since Homosexual: Oppression & Liberation (Angus & Robertson) was first published in 1972. In 2006, the Bulletin listed Dennis as one of the 100 most influential Australians ever, and he was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in 2008. He has been President of the AIDS Society of Asia and the Pacific (2001–05), a member of the Governing Council of the International AIDS Society (2004–12) and the Board of Oxfam Australia (2006–10). His most recent books are The End of the Homosexual? (UQP, 2013); Queer Wars (Wiley, 2016), co-authored with Jon Symons; and How to Vote Progressive in Australia (Monash University Publishing, 2016), co-edited with Sean Scalmer.

 

This author has contributed 3 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

Steven Alward was Head of Policy and Development for ABC News and Current Affairs, and former Head of International News and Head of Radio National.

This author has contributed 1 pieces to Griffith Review. See full biography

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