A perfectly ordinary dachshund observes the problem of being

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  • Published 20231107
  • ISBN: 978-1-922212-89-4
  • Extent: 207pp
  • Paperback, ePub, PDF, Kindle compatible

Breathing your small inauspicious body almost 

into incomprehension, supine and crouched,

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