Advance Australia green

Featured in

  • Published 20080603
  • ISBN: 9780733322815
  • Extent: 272 pp
  • Paperback (234 x 153mm)

ON OCTOBER 1, 1988, at Bibbenluke near Cooma in the Snowy Mountains, a feral fish was declared an Australian and a blow was struck against environmental republicanism. A citizenship certificate had been taken – probably from the local shire council – and 124 years after it was introduced, the trout was unofficially naturalised.

The fish was represented by a member of the Cooma Trout Acclimatisation Association, who swore an oath on its behalf to the Queen and to acclimatisation societies.

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

If you are an educator or student wishing to access content for study purposes please contact us at griffithreview@griffith.edu.au

Share article

More from author

What lies beneath

ReportageWALK AROUND THE Sydney city block bounded by Kent, Sussex, Napoleon and Erskine Streets and you are on top of a cultural ground zero....

More from this edition

A new land, 1976

MemoirSYDNEY. I LIKED its sound. I pressed my nose against the cold plastic window to look out over the city as we landed.‘Look! The...

A radical legacy

EssaySelected for Best Australian Political Writing 2009LIKE ALL GREAT speeches, the Tenterfield Oration delivered on October 24, 1889 – the most significant speech in...

Stories from the dustbin

Essay‘A WRITER,' DECLARED the novelist Thomas Mann, ‘is someone for whom writing is harder than it is for other people.' University-based historians working in...

Stay up to date with the latest, news, articles and special offers from Griffith Review.