Caius Atlas

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  • Published 20160202
  • ISBN: 978-1-925240-80-1
  • Extent: 264pp
  • Paperback (234 x 153mm), eBook

THE BABY-NAME BOOK is the size of a pack of cards, left on top of a bin outside the port. I picture a pregnant woman reading it, circling her belly with her palm, looking up to see the ferry arrive which will take her back to England. She’s been on holiday, beside a clean, warm beach in France. Maybe she left the book by mistake, having found the perfect name, or maybe she and her husband could never agree. Maybe, the baby never arrived.

I write Almaz on the inside cover and take it back to my tent to read. My Eritrean name isn’t listed. Temperance Ophelia and Claire Adelrune are my favourite names for a girl. For a boy I’ve chosen Monroe Carlisle and, my favourite, Caius Atlas.

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