The age of discovery

Unearthing humanity’s origin story

Featured in

  • Published 20230502
  • ISBN: 978-1-922212-83-2
  • Extent: 264pp
  • Paperback (234 x 153mm), eBook

Professor Michael Petraglia has always been drawn to the distant past. Growing up, he pored over copies of National Geographic and books about Ancient Egypt that his family – particularly his older sister – would gift him every Christmas. So it seems only natural that he would pursue a career in archaeology that’s taken him around the world, from teaching at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge in the UK to directing field projects in Africa and Asia that have reframed our understanding of ancient human migration. Professor Petraglia is now the Director of Griffith University’s Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution (ARCHE), and he talked to Griffith Review Editor Carody Culver about the origin story of our species – which, like humanity itself, is constantly evolving. 

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

If you are an educator or student wishing to access content for study purposes please contact us at griffithreview@griffith.edu.au

Share article

About the author

Michael Petraglia

Michael Petraglia is Director of theAustralian Research Centre for Human Evolution at Griffith University. From 2001 to 2016 he taught at the universities of...

More from this edition

The emperor’s new opponent

Non-fictionAsk many of my colleagues to define AI and they will tell you…that it’s about getting computers to do tasks that humans require intelligence to perform. Or, to put it another way, it’s about faking human performance on intelligent tasks.

The transhuman era

Non-fictionThe story of the transhuman era has much in common with the creation myths of old – and with religious tales of transcendence. It heralds the emergence of a powerful – omniscient, omnipresent – force (AI) possessing intelligence that far exceeds our own. And lends itself to stories that play off destruction against what you could term ‘salvation’, in the form of digital immortality.

Back to the red earth

FictionBefore she opens her eyes, she knows with the very same certainty that she is of this land that Juanjo, her lover and the father of her five guris, isn’t going to be asleep by her side. But she could for once be wrong. So, she stretches out her arm and feels around. Instead, her fingertips touch his perfectly tucked-­in bedsheet. His side of the bed is vacant like the rows of this year’s failed crop.

Stay up to date with the latest, news, articles and special offers from Griffith Review.