Stories from the city 

Placemaking and public art 

Featured in

  • Published 20230801
  • ISBN: 978-1-922212-86-3
  • Extent: 196pp
  • Paperback (234 x 153mm), eBook

The urban landscape is full of hidden histories – and for curators Amanda Hayman and Troy Casey, it’s also rich with creative potential and community value. As the co-directors of Blaklash, an Aboriginal design agency that specialises in First Nations placemaking, they curate, create and consult on everything from public art installations to major architectural and urban development projects. By foregrounding Indigenous perspectives and stories, they reveal the ways in which public art can help shape the identity of a city, offering residents and visitors new ways of understanding the environmental landmarks of their daily lives.

CARODY CULVER: How did Blaklash begin, and how would you describe your ethos? 

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About the author

Amanda Hayman

Amanda Hayman grew up in Logan city and has cultural connections to Kalkadoon and Wakka Wakka Country in Queensland. She is the co-founder and...

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