Flowers and fruit

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  • Published 20221101
  • ISBN: 978-1-922212-74-0
  • Extent: 264pp
  • Paperback (234 x 153mm), eBook

After the painting of the same name by William Buelow Gould, 1849

Poppies like poppies. Pears, pears.

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