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  • Published 20230801
  • ISBN: 978-1-922212-86-3
  • Extent: 196pp
  • Paperback (234 x 153mm), eBook

I DIDN’T KNOW whose idea it was to start breaking into houses. Maybe it was nobody’s, just one of those acts of God I’d read about – the burning bush, the parted sea, the unused knife – that appeared from nowhere as if nothing could have happened otherwise. 

Addy, Bel and I lived in a town with many names, none of which mattered. So we called it Et Cetera because there were always more suburbs, more white fences, more water tanks, more fields, more names, more time. 

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About the author

Daniel Ray

Daniel Ray’s work has previously appeared in Westerly, Overland, Island, Cordite, Voiceworks and Cicerone Journal’s 2020 anthology, These Strange Outcrops. He is currently studying...

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