At the subway station

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  • Published 20230801
  • ISBN: 978-1-922212-86-3
  • Extent: 196pp
  • Paperback (234 x 153mm), eBook

In a world of cunning shades
I’m the only sleuth. I hop on the train

bound for a future
I’ve been hired to investigate.

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About the author

Gavin Yuan Gao

Gavin Yuan Gao is a genderqueer non-binary poet. Their debut poetry collection, At the Altar of Touch, was published by the University of Queensland...

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