Hey, Utopia!


What are the possibilities and pitfalls of imagining a better future?

Griffith Review 73: Hey, Utopia! explores the ramifications of Thomas More's term in a range of contexts: the possible and the improbable, the out of reach and almost realised.

 

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Submissions open for Griffith Review 76: Acts of Reckoning

Submissions open for Griffith Review 76: Acts of Reckoning


How can we begin to imagine a better future without a full recognition of the past and a full recognition of the moral force of First Nations? And how can this examination and exchange take place in an era of quick assumptions and divides, alternative facts and cancellations?

Submissions are open now for Griffith Review 76: Acts of Reckoning. Find out more here and submit via Submittable by 18 November 2021.

Image credit: Michael Cook, Undiscovered #3 (2010)

 

Through the window: Letter to Nardi

Through the window: Letter to Nardi


Nardi, you’ve made me realise the in between is figurative, where we can reach each other across space and time with words and love, but that it can also be physical.

In our latest Through the Window, Cameron Muir writes a letter to Yuwaalaraay author Nardi Simpson.

Read the piece in full here.

Through the window: Remembering Nurreegoo

Through the window: Remembering Nurreegoo


I see the corroboree of his work in the gathering of traditional knowledge and information and its artistic presentation. This knowledge, this information, was represented in all of his creations to tell the story of his people – creations that speak to their history and truth.

In our latest Through the Window, writer Angelina Hurley remembers her father, the renowned Aboriginal artist Ron Hurley.

Read the piece in full here.

Through the window: Into the sun

Through the window: Into the sun


In the queer community, we’ve been locked out before; now we’re locked down. We were prepared, perhaps, but we still feel it like the pain of pressing on a wound. The trick, it seems, is to feel it all but not mind so much.

In our latest Through the Window, writer and tsunami scientist Kaya Wilson reflects on the small joys and lost connections of locked-down living.

Read the piece in full here.

The Latest

  • Letter to Nardi
    NARDI, I WANT to walk with you up to my local nature reserve, where I’ll meet your sister Jilda, with questions your piece has me thin...
  • Remembering Nurreegoo
    THIS IS A story about my father, Ron Hurley, the first Aboriginal artist to graduate from the Queensland College of Art. With the upcoming anniversaries of his birthday (19 October 1946) and passing (3 November 2002), I wanted to remember him and to ...
  • Into the sun
    I LOVE THE big windows of this house; on a good day they amplify the sun and allow us to bask in a different climate. In this way, we gain a few degrees of latitude, several degrees warmer than the climate of the bedroom on the other side of the hous...

Current Edition

EDITION 73
Hey, Utopia!
Visiting utopias old and new, near and far, Hey, Utopia! explores the possibilities and pitfalls of imagining a better future. Where will it take us next? And do we even want to go there?

Next Edition

EDITION 74
Escape Routes
From mermaids and space matriarchs to fresh starts and flights of fancy, Escape Routes explores what it means to break out and break free.
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