Events

Yarra Valley Writers Festival – Griffith Review Sunday Writerly Session

 

This is a time when we need conversations, connection and our thinkers and writers more than ever.

In that spirit, Yarra Valley Writers Festival has been reimagined and reengineered into a live-streamed event on Saturday 9 May along with a series of streamed Sunday Writerly Sessions for the rest of the month.

 

Griffith Review is hosting a terrific panel on Sunday 10 May to celebrate our 68th edition, Getting On.

Join Charlotte Wood, Donna Ward and Ailsa Piper and editor Ashley Hay in conversation about this world where seventy is the new fifty, where old age isn’t what it used to be.

As the proportion of older Australians continues to rise, the lived experience of... Read more

Griffith Review 68: Getting On – National online launch

Join contributors Charlotte Wood, Tony Birch and Vicki Laveau-Harvie, along with editor Ashley Hay, for the launch of Griffith Review 68: Getting On – a compelling exploration of the meaning of getting older in a world where seventy is the new fifty.

COVID-19 has recast fundamental concepts of ageing, maturity and mortality. And with the virus’s particular impacts on the aged, it’s time to challenge – and rectify – the exclusion of the elderly from our culture – and focus on people as people, not as problems to be solved.

With new work from Helen Garner, Gabbie Stroud, David Sinclair, Samuel Wagan Watson, Andrew Stafford, Jay Phillips, Jane R Goodall, Glenn A Albrecht, Leah Kaminsky and many more, Griffith Review 68: Getting On offers an insightful exploration of the changing truths of ageing – as well as celebrating the triumph of longevity.

When: 6.30–7.30pm Tuesday 12 May

Where: Zoom online, hosted by Avid Reader

Tickets:... Read more

ABC RN Big Ideas – Reimagining trust in a time of COVID-19

Inspired by Griffith Review 67: Matters of Trust, published in partnership with ANZSOG, Professor Glyn Davis AC, Professor Anne Tiernan and Professor Caitlin Byrne explore the implications and opportunities of a collapse in trust in the age of COVID-19. Join ABC Radio National’s Paul Barclay for a conversation that considers Australia’s unique heritage in unconventional alliances and asks us to imagine reform in the face of change we can’t always see coming.

Listen: 8.00 pm, Tuesday 28 April 2020, ABC Radio National
Stream: https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/

 

What role do alliances and divisions play in our experiences of trust? What are the possibilities of the unconventional, the improvised?

What we trust, who we trust and how we trust sit at the centre of today’s most complex debates, particularly now we are in the midst of a global pandemic. Australia is a country sceptical of its government, a country asking profound questions of its traditional institutions –... Read more

How do we restore trust in government?

Can the public service take the lead in restoring trust or must we wait for politicians to act? Do we need changes to laws and structures, or culture change driven by public servants themselves? What capabilities will we need for the future? Is the sports affair an exception or the new normal?

Join editor Ashley Hay, ANZSOG Dean and CEO Ken Smith, the Grattan Institute’s Kate Griffiths and the University of Melbourne’s Sarah Maddison to discuss all this and more at a free event produced in collaboration with the Australia and New Zealand School of Government, publication partner of Matters of Trust.

When: 12 pm, Thursday 5 March
Where: Village Roadshow Theatrette, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne
Tickets: Free (registration essential)

Adelaide Writers’ Week

At this free panel discussion, Ashley Hay asks Rachel Ankeny, Danielle Wood, Anne Tiernan and Natasha Cica how we might connect to one another, reclaim our power and trust once more.

When: 3.45 pm, Wednesday 4 March
Where: West Stage, Pioneer Women’s Memorial Garden, Adelaide
Tickets: Free (more information here)

Matters of Trust – Hobart launch

Join contributors Natasha Cica and Damon Young and Griffith Review editor Ashley Hay in conversation with Amanda Ducker for the Tasmanian launch of Matters of Trust.

When: 5.30 pm, Thursday 27 February
Where: Fullers Bookshop, Hobart
Tickets: Free (RSVP online)

Matters of Trust – Sydney launch

In a discussion chaired by Ashley Hay, criminal defence lawyer Teela ReidDavid Ritter, CEO of Greenpeace Australia Pacific and University of Sydney fellow Frances Flanagan take a closer look at their contributions to Griffith Review 67: Matters of Trust.

With new work from Anne Tiernan, David Ritter, Cameron Muir, Alex Miller, Sophie Overett, Omar Sakr, John Kinsella and many more, this timely edition of Griffith Review explores the implications and opportunities of a collapse in trust, from diplomacy to the dynamics of the most intimate personal relationships. In asking how we can find connection in increasingly divided and disrupted spaces, Matters of Trust offers stories of transformation, epiphany and hope.

When: 6 pm, Wednesday 19 February
Where: Gleebooks, Glebe, Sydney
Tickets: $9–12, gleeclub free (available online)

Griffith Review 67: Matters of Trust is published with the support of ANZSOG.

Matters of Trust – Brisbane launch

Join contributors Anita Heiss, Ellen Wengert and AJ Brown, along with editor Ashley Hay, for the launch of Griffith Review 67: Matters of Trust – a fascinating forensic examination of how we experience trust in our public and personal lives.

With new work from Anne Tiernan, David Ritter, Cameron Muir, Alex Miller, Sophie Overett, Omar Sakr, John Kinsella and many more, this timely edition of Griffith Review explores the implications and opportunities of a collapse in trust, from diplomacy to the dynamics of the most intimate personal relationships. In asking how we can find connection in increasingly divided and disrupted spaces, Matters of Trust offers stories of transformation, epiphany and hope.

When: 6–8 pm, Tuesday 11 February 2020
Where: Avid Reader, West End
Tickets: Sorry – all seats taken!

Griffith Review 67: Matters of Trust is published with the support of ANZSOG.

Griffith Review Bookclub – Brisbane

Join Ashley Hay and international bestselling author Holly Ringland at Avid Reader in Brisbane to celebrate The Light Ascending at the inaugural Griffith Review Bookclub.

Featuring ‘The market seller’, Ringland’s first published work since The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart, as well as new fiction, non-fiction and poetry from Australia and beyond, Griffith Review 66: The Light Ascending is the ultimate compendium of summer reading.

This very special event invites you to go beyond the page: listen as Ringland describes writing her sweet and bitter short story; discuss your reactions, thoughts and experiences with a community of fellow readers; and gain new perspectives on a spellbinding edition of Griffith Review.

Remember: you needn’t have finished the edition to join the discussion – but it’s not too late to start! Head to your local bookstore or jump online to grab a copy and find yourself instantly transported by new work from... Read more

Brisbane launch – The Light Ascending

Join Mirandi Riwoe, Allanah Hunt, Krissy Kneen, Holden Sheppard and editor Ashley Hay to launch Griffith Review 66: The Light Ascending in Brisbane.

The Light Ascending, published 5 November, tells tales of escapes: escapes from who we are, where we’re from and what we know. The stories in this collection traverse continents, cultures and generations: a Javanese artist’s model fights to survive in nineteenth-century Paris; a woman reckons with her past from deep within a coma; a trio of performers try to carve a place for themselves in an insular town; a family faces a tragedy that threatens to tear them apart.

The Light Ascending features the 2019 winners of The Novella Project VII: Julienne van Loon, Mirandi Riwoe, Keren Heenan and Allanah Hunt. The winners of Griffith Review’s seventh annual novella competition, supported by Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund, were chosen by expert judges Maxine Beneba Clarke, Aviva Tuffield and Holden Sheppard.

This edition... Read more

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